Police lack basic interviewing skills: Study

Screen grabs from a videotaped interrogation show Kevin Gregson as he is questioned by Det. Tim...

Screen grabs from a videotaped interrogation show Kevin Gregson as he is questioned by Det. Tim Hodgins in a three-hour interview on Dec. 29, 2009. The videotape was shown during Gregson's trial for the murder of Eric Czapnik on Tuesday, March 6, 2012. (Police videotape)

Kelly Roche, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 4:28 PM ET

OTTAWA - Two chairs. One table. The pursuit of truth.

When suspects are seated across the table, it's in the best interest of police to properly and fairly conduct interviews, says the president of the Defence Counsel Association of Ottawa.

"The interview is one of the cornerstones of the criminal justice system," said James Foord.

"I mean, it's the most dramatic thing next to the trial, right? The confrontation of officer and accused; it's pretty big stuff."

Getting it right leads "to reliable, truthful results," said Foord.

Canadian cops' interviewing skills are lacklustre, according to a study led by psychologist Dr. Brent Snook from Memorial University of Newfoundland.



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