Can Rob Ford win re-election?

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford speaks to media about the Supreme Court refusal to hear the appeal of his...

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford speaks to media about the Supreme Court refusal to hear the appeal of his conflict of interest victory Thursday, June 20, 2013. (DAVE ABEL/QMI Agency)

Adrienne Batra , Toronto Sun

, Last Updated: 11:25 AM ET

It was about this time four years ago the unbelievable started to become believable.

As astonishing as it was for his political opponents and some in the media to watch, Coun. Rob Ford, the loud and obnoxious fiscal hawk from the suburbs, defeated the establishment frontrunner, George Smitherman, in the race for Toronto mayor.

Public opinion polling started to show a shift in the electorate, and while the term “Ford Nation” may not yet have been coined, the message was loud and clear: Toronto wanted to be led by one of its “own”: an everyday guy.

But four years later, too much has changed for Ford and Toronto.

He is no longer the loud, over-the-top councillor from Etobicoke North.

He turned out to be deeply flawed.

Ford is an alcoholic, drug abusing and, many would argue, bigoted mayor seeking a second mandate.

Ford’s antics no longer just embarrass himself — he has now brought shame to the Office of the Mayor and to our city.

Now, the electorate is more deeply divided on Ford.

Everyone knows who he is and they all have an opinion on him.


Videos

Photos