Norway's new Arctic spy ship unveiled, as Canada trails behind

A new a $250-million Norwegian spy ship, tentatively named Marjata, will be equipped with sensors...

A new a $250-million Norwegian spy ship, tentatively named Marjata, will be equipped with sensors and other technology to snoop on Russia's activities in the Arctic beginning in 2016. (Norwegian Armed Forces/QMI Agency)

Andrew McIntosh, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 7:14 PM ET

MONTREAL ­— Norway is spending $250 million on a new spy boat to track Russian activities in the Arctic, while Canada's efforts to safeguard its northern sovereignty appear to be moving in slow motion.

The hull of the new ship, to be operated by the Norwegian military intelligence service and enter service in 2016, was delivered recently to a military base in Alesund, a coastal town northwest of Oslo in the Scandinavian kingdom of 5 million people.

Norwegian military intelligence is currently working to install ultra-sensitive spying equipment. The spy ship, which looks like a large car-and-truck ferry, was built in Romania.

Twenty military intelligence agents will work on board, Norwegian officials said, without giving more details on their specific tasks.

With global warming and melting ice in the Arctic, several countries, including Canada and Russia, are very interested in the region for its mineral resources and petroleum and natural reserves.

 

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