PLATT: Stop putting a damper on the ice-bucket challenge

Judy Varga, middle, joins her daughters Reanna, left, and Rachelle in their southwest Calgary home...

Judy Varga, middle, joins her daughters Reanna, left, and Rachelle in their southwest Calgary home as they hold the Tony Proudfoot Award, presented to them and Judy's late husband Barry along with the Allan McCachen family for their work in making a film promoting awareness of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS. Stuart Dryden/Calgary Sun/QMI Agency

Michael Platt, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 12:07 AM ET

After so much ice water, it was inevitable a little whine would follow.

"Stop wasting water and annoying your Facebook friends," is one typically cranky post, part of a small but predictable backlash against the ice-bucket challenge.

Such contrarians are all part of the popularity contest that is social media: Make a few snarly comments about the latest popular trend, and people will pay attention to you for being different, so then you can be popular too.

Normally, it would be best to ignore the haters. But this is no ordinary trend, and even if Facebook and Twitter end up saturated with videos of soaked and shivering people, every ice-bucket shower and $10 donation is a tale worth telling.

Mainly because the story of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis has so seldom been heard before.

"How do runs and walks and wearing ribbons cure anything either? They don't, but they bring attention to it -- and that's how you get the money for more funding and research," said Judy Varga.

For six heartbreaking years, the Calgary widow watched her husband Barry Varga fight a battle on two fronts.


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