'Race card approach' is getting old: Brodbeck

Hundreds of Manitobans attended a vigil at Alexander Docks in Winnipeg, Man., on Tues., Aug. 16,...

Hundreds of Manitobans attended a vigil at Alexander Docks in Winnipeg, Man., on Tues., Aug. 16, 2014 to honour the memory of two aboriginal people. The bodies of Tina Fontaine and Faron Hall were found in two separate recoveries on Sun., Aug. 17, 2014. (Brook Jones/QMI Agency File)

Tom Brodbeck, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 7:07 PM ET

Before we rush out and spend tens of millions of dollars on a national inquiry to figure out why so many aboriginal women have been murdered over the past few decades, maybe we should start looking at who's doing the killing.

According to an RCMP report released in May, the vast majority of murdered aboriginal women were not killed by strangers, they were killed by spouses, boyfriends, family members or acquaintances of the victims.

"Female homicide victims generally know the person who kills them -- more than 90% had a previous relationship with them," said the report. "This is true for aboriginal and non-aboriginal female victims."

We know who's killing aboriginal women. Most of them are men -- 89%. Close to 40% of the killers were either the spouses or boyfriends of the victims, 23% of them were family members, and 30% were acquaintances. Only a small minority of the killers were strangers -- 8%.5


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