Toronto Police end 'hobocop' distracted driving blitz

Const. Brian Kellar dressed as a homeless person as part of Toronto Police distracted driver...

Const. Brian Kellar dressed as a homeless person as part of Toronto Police distracted driver awareness campaign. (@PCArsenault Twitter photo)

Jenny Yuen, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 8:00 PM ET

TORONTO -- Police are calling their distracted driving blitz quits after five days in operation.

An officer clad in Aussie oilskin coats, hoodies, sunglasses and holding up cardboard signs along highway off-ramps in order to catch drivers on the cellphones violates provincial law.

"It isn't the first time that alternative means of seeing somebody committing an offence has been used," traffic services Const. Clinton Stibbe said Wednesday, confirming the program stopped Monday.

"I think Ottawa did something where a plainclothes officer was checking for individuals using cellphones and the individual was not in a police uniform. It's no different than using the hearse that we equip with police lighting -- is it any different? No, not really."

Stibbe is referring to QMI Agency columnist Joe Warmington's story Wednesday, which depicted the "hobocop" -- Const. Brian Kellar dressed in the coat, hooded sweatshirt and holding up a cardboard sign that read, "I've got high hopes" on one side and on the other, identifying himself as a police officer about to dole out a cellphone ticket.

 


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