Top court upholds Canada's anti-terror laws

The Supreme Court of Canada building in Ottawa, Ont. (JOHN MAJOR/QMI AGENCY, file)

The Supreme Court of Canada building in Ottawa, Ont. (JOHN MAJOR/QMI AGENCY, file)

Jessica Murphy, Parliamentary Bureau

, Last Updated: 3:07 PM ET

OTTAWA - Canada's top court has upheld this country's anti-terror laws as constitutional.

In two 7-0 decisions, the Supreme Court dismissed the arguments of three men who were ensnared in counterterrorism investigations.

The men argued Canada's definition of "terrorist activity" is unconstitutional and contravenes the rights to life, liberty and security of the person and freedom of religion and expression.

In the first ruling, dealing mainly with the case of convicted terrorist Momin Khawaja, the judges rejected the argument that Canada's definition of terrorism is too broad, saying the definition is clear enough someone would have to knowingly contribute to terrorist activity to be convicted under the provision.


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