Two Canadians killed in Nairobi attack

Annemarie Desloges, 29, an official of the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, is...

Annemarie Desloges, 29, an official of the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, is pictured in this undated Facebook photo. Desloges is one of the 39 victims of the terrorist attack Saturday, September 2013 in Nairobi, Kenya. Facebook/QMI Agency

QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 11:18 PM ET

Two Canadians were killed in the horrific terrorist attack at a Kenya shopping mall Saturday, officials confirmed.

 

Gunmen stormed the Westgate mall in the capital, Nairobi, on Saturday, killing at least 39 people in an attack claimed by the Somali Islamist group al Shabaab.

Canadian diplomat Annemarie Desloges, 29, was among the dead.

Desloges "was a distinguished public servant of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration who served in Canada's High Commission to Kenya, as a liaison officer with the Canada Border Services Agency. She will be remembered and honoured," Prime Minister Stephen Harper said in a statement.

"Canada condemns in the strongest possible terms this cowardly, hateful act that apparently targeted innocent civilians who were simply out shopping," he said.

Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird expressed his "heartfelt sadness" over the loss of "distinguished public servant" Desloges and said he has spoken with Kenyan Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohamed about the "heinous" terrorist attack.

"I offered our condolences to all the victims of todays attack and Canada's full support in the fight against terrorism," Baird said in a tweet.

Desloges' husband, Robert Munk, was injured in the attack and released.

The name of the other Canadian victim has not yet been disclosed.

Al Shabaab, which has links to al-Qaida and is battling Kenyan and other African peacekeepers in Somalia, had repeatedly threatened attacks on Kenyan soil if Nairobi did not pull its troops out of the Horn of Africa country.

WARNING: VIDEO CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES

Baird, speaking to reporters after the Ont. PC convention Saturday night, aimed remarks directly at the attackers.

 

"Al Shabab has wreaked havoc on this part of the world for far too long," he said. "This is the fight against international terrorism - the great struggle of our generation. We need to continue with the resolve to fight this. It's a joint effort. No government can tackle this problem on its own."

President Uhuru Kenyatta said close members of his own family were among those killed, and more than 150 people were wounded.

The Kenyan presidency said on its Twitter feed that one wounded gunman had been arrested, but had died in hospital.

One woman leaving the building told a journalist that one of the attackers had told all Muslims to leave the area.

"Terrorist attacks like this seek to undermine the very values and way of life that Canadians cherish, and they reinforce the need for us to continue taking strong actions to protect the safety of Canadians no matter where they are in the world," Harper said.

--with files from Reuters

 

 

 


Videos

Photos