For Stephen Harper, change in the Middle East must come but come slowly

Catching up with a pro-Mubarak supporter on his camel after his charge through the crowd. CNN would...

Catching up with a pro-Mubarak supporter on his camel after his charge through the crowd. CNN would later report that these camel riders normally work at the nearby Giza Pyramids and were upset that nine days of anti-government protests had caused the tourism business to evaporate. Supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak used camels Wednesday, February 2, 2011 in mass protests at Tahrir Square (David Akin/QMI Agency)

David Akin, Parliamentary Bureau Chief

, Last Updated: 10:24 AM ET

AMMAN, Jordan -- The camels that charged through the democracy protestors on Tahrir Square almost three years ago to the day finished their wild gallop a few metres in front of me.

And when I talked to the camel drivers, they showed neither remorse nor concern for any they had injured as they rode threw the throng.

But they were angry. Angry that the first stirrings of a democracy movement in their ancient land had driven away all the tourists they depended on for their living renting out camels to Westerners who wanted to ride around the pyramids.

I met many shopkeepers, hoteliers, and taxi drivers in Cairo that week who said something similar.

 


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