IN 5 Minutes: Deadly heat

Peace Officer B. Grey uses a temperature gauge to measure the temperature inside a vehicle, in...

Peace Officer B. Grey uses a temperature gauge to measure the temperature inside a vehicle, in Edmonton Alta., on Wednesday July 2, 2014. Grey was talking part in a press conference where she discussed the importance of not leaving pets in vehicles during the hot summer months. David Bloom/QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 12:21 AM ET

So far this year, 16 children in the U.S. have died from heatstroke after being left in cars. The most notable case this year is 22-month-old Cooper Harris, of Georgia, who died after his father failed to drop him off at day care and left him in the car while he was at work.



IN 5 Minutes: Deadly heat
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The sun’s shortwave radiation passes through a vehicle’s transparent windows, heating objects that it strikes – such as a dark dashboard, steering wheel or seats. Temperatures of interior objects can easily reach 82.2 C (180 F), up to more than 93.3 C (200 F).

Heat emanating from interior objects raises the temperature of adjacent air by conduction and convection and also gives off longwave radiation, which quickly warms the air trapped inside a vehicle.


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